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Real Music Corporate LogoVisionary new age music for nourishing and rejuvenating body, mind and spirit

Namasté

Namasté by Various Artists

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Namaste - Various Artists

I could listen to this over and over again, all day long, and feel totally at ease with myself — in my fast paced life.” —Liz Doan, Music Design

The beautiful music on Namasté is ideal for contemplation and introspection. In attuning yourself to the spirit of this ancient greeting, you can open the portals to your own radiant beauty. On the second CD is a recorded meditation that will gently guide you from a safe place in nature to a meeting with your more real Self.

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Tracks

1. Returning to Now 4:51 from Enlightenment: A Sacred Collection by Karunesh
5
Average: 5 (1 vote)
4. Lotus Call Part 1 (Vajra Guru Mantra) 7:30 from Om Mani Padme Hum by Buedi Siebert
5
Average: 5 (1 vote)
5. Horizon of Gold 13.05 from The Spirit of Yoga by Ben Leinbach
5
Average: 5 (1 vote)
7. Calling Wisdom 5:33 from Enlightenment: A Sacred Collection by Karunesh
5
Average: 5 (1 vote)
9. Inside the Heart 4:47 from Wave Hands Like Clouds by Buedi Siebert
5
Average: 5 (1 vote)

Press Acclaim

Liz Doan

Namasté is one of the finest compilations I’ve ever heard. Each track flows seamlessly into the next. I could listen to this over and over again, all day long, and feel totally at ease with myself — in my fast paced life.

Amy Williams - L.M.T

Namasté; is the latest compilation from Terence Yallop of Real Music.  Its sound creates images of an ashram with burning candles, chanting seekers and the scent of nag champa wafting throughout a serene atmosphere. Various artists with many individual styles meld together as one to create a unified feel on this contemplative CD.

The first artist on the disc, Karunesh, actually honed his musical skills while living in an ashram, learning and playing with artists from cultures around the world. With synthesizers, tinkling chimes, chanting and flutes, his music sets the tone for an entirely meditative CD. The next track, by Rasa, is my favorite. Vocalist Kim Waters and cellist Hans Christian write devotional Bhajans. These songs in praise of Krishna continue the prayerful feel of the disc. A track of solo Tibetan singing bowls rounds it out nicely, taking the listener to yet a higher plane.

The word namasté; is Sanskrit, derived from namas, which means to bow, and te, to you. The contemporary translation is something along the lines of “The source in me (or the highest in me) greets the source in you”; Yallop creates this in the feel of the music he produces. In the liner notes, he writes “music is one of the wands the soul uses to arouse consciousness. It stimulates the release of our inner wisdom.” This selection cocoons your client, wrapping her in the consciousness of this spiritual awareness.

Dene Bebbington

Throughout the world there are several forms of greeting. This album is named [after] a Hindu greeting “namaste” which means “I bow to you.” Knowing this, it comes as no surprise that much of the music has an Indian flavour, though there are sounds which make one think of other climes with a spiritual reputation such as Tibet and Nepal. The album seems to be designed for use in contemplation and introspection; and, presumably to aid in reaching one’s inner self, there’s a second CD for meditation spoken by Terence Yallop. In this review, I’ll only be covering the music CD.

Featured are tracks taken from albums by Karunesh, Rasa, Devakant, Buedi Siebert, Ben Leinbach, Benjamin Iobst, and Gary Malkin. Readers familiar with the output from Real Music will probably recognize many of these artists, and those people who like the more meditative style of music will surely enjoy this disc. Saying that, it works reasonably well simply as enjoyable music, being best suited as background unless you’re using it for a session of contemplation. The disc opens up with what I consider to be the two best tracks: “Returning to Now” by Karunesh and “Prabhupada Padma” by Rasa. By best I mean that they’re perhaps the most musical in the sense of having pleasing melodies and sounds. On “Returning to Now” there’s a mix of synth, traditional Indian instrument and sounds, and in places a male voice delivering what could be a prayer somewhat like a song. This is nicely followed by the percussive and rhythmic “Prabhupada Padma” featuring beautiful female singing vocals and what could be a cello. Subsequent pieces are generally more contemplative in nature, especially those with bell-like and Tibetan singing bowl sounds. I didn’t get all meditative listening to the disc but the music is certainly calming, and I think that’s partly to do with how this kind of music encourages me to imagine inspiring and tranquil scenery like the mountains of Tibet. I think the audience for this album is likely to be those who particularly like restrained Eastern style music.