Real Music Corporate LogoVisionary new age music for nourishing and rejuvenating body, mind and spirit

Real Music Corporate LogoVisionary new age music for nourishing and rejuvenating body, mind and spirit

Namaste Yoga

Namaste Yoga by Various Artists

The chance to revisit your favorite artists perfectly sequenced, and ideally combined for yoga, meditation, massage or any relaxation experience.” —Bette Timm

Namaste Yoga has been specifically arranged to hold an optimal resonance for elevating the spirit and maintaining distraction-free focus in either a personal practice or class setting. Whether for yoga, meditation or simply feeling uplifted, slip effortlessly into a sacred sanctuary with this sublime hour-plus of music.

“Yoga doesn't take time, it gives time.” —Ganga White

Watch the video of “Prana” from Namaste Yoga.

Tracks

1. Abhaya Mudra 3:04 from Ayurveda: The Fragrance of Wellbeing by Kiran Murti
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2. Guru Charanam 9:52 from Inyan by Sacred Earth
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4. Flowing Bamboo 6:08 from Enlightenment: A Sacred Collection by Karunesh
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Average: 5 (2 votes)
5. Bhakti Heenam 7:06 from Bhakti by Sacred Earth
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Average: 5 (1 vote)
6. Khumjung 15.30 from The Spirit of Yoga by Ben Leinbach
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7. Shakti Dhyana 8:43 from Path of the Divine by Rajendra Teredesai
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Average: 5 (1 vote)
8. Pitta 3:00 from Ayurveda: The Fragrance of Wellbeing by Kiran Murti
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9. Moola Mantra 8:37 from The Way Home by Sacred Earth
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Press Acclaim

Michael Foster

With another release in the Namasté series of albums, Real Music has once again gathered together some exceptional songs around a common theme. This time Real Music has delved into their catalog of music to find songs that support the practice of yoga hence, the album title Namasté Yoga. This album features nine songs by six artists that will give the listener a little more than an hour to fully enter into their practice of yoga and put them into the proper state of mind with which to obtain the most benefit from their time invested. Yoga is a physical, mental and a spiritual practice that has a variety of goals including stress relief, fitness, improved immunity, increased energy, and inner peace. The music found on this collection will allow the practitioner to focus their minds and spirits to achieve the greatest results over the course of this album.
 
Of course just because an album is called Namasté Yoga does not mean that the music can’t have other applications, because the music contained in this compilation would also be a good companion to meditation and relaxation.  Standout tracks include “Khumjung” by Ben Leinbach, “Flowing Bamboo” by Karunesh and “Bhakti Heenam” by Sacred Earth. The music on Namasté Yoga paints a rich landscape with flutes, sitars, chants, finger bells, percussion and wind chimes all the while carrying the listener away from the busy world of the 21st century and creating a space that allows them to fully concentrate on their own breath and being instead of whatever happened during the course of their day. 21st century life does not always lend itself to finding that quiet place physically or within our spirits where our focus can be on something other than the concerns of the day, but with an album like Namasté Yoga the listener will have a better chance of stilling the noise, quieting their spirit and achieving a balance that can be challenging to find.
 
It is not always appreciated as to how much skill is required to find and blend songs on a collection like this so that the overall effect of the album is that you don’t notice that there are six artists performing these songs because they all sound like they belong together, almost as if they were written for this particular project. You will find that all of the artists on this album are top notch musicians and vocalists which says a lot about the performers, but there is credit due to Terence Yallop of Real Music for being able to weave these artists into an album that coalesces around the shared theme of the practice of yoga. Take it from someone who has created many mix discs having thousands of songs from which to choose from to express a theme or to create a particular mood. It is not as easy as you might think. Others have said that music used in the practice of yoga can lift your mood, bring memories to the surface, inspire you to push through the more challenging poses, and even allow your mind to focus more fully. I think that this collection of songs will offer practitioners much inspiration as they unfurl over the course of an hour leading the listener ever deeper on their inward journey. Enjoy the journey with this music as your soundtrack and I bow to the God within you. Ambient Visions recommends this album.

RJ Lannan

Mind Stretching … Almost every time I hear the word Namasté, I am reminded of the scene in the movie Avatar where the Naavi acknowledge each other. They translate their words as “I see you”, but actually referring to an understanding beyond the visual. Such is the earthly translation we are given for Namasté; “I bow to you”, I acknowledge your existence, your spirit. The talented artists who have contributed to this collection bow to your physical and metaphysical health. On Namasté Yoga, the fifth contribution to the Real Music Namasté Series, I was delighted with the nine tracks of peaceful, spiritually motivated music that is perfect for meditation, exercise, or just plain relaxing. The recording is aimed toward yoga sessions, but I am hesitant to say just yoga, as yoga to me is not only a form of structured exercise, but also a religion and a philosophy. In this case, I use the term for exercise in general. The recording has offerings by international, well-known artists Kiran Murti, Sacred Earth, Karunesh, Ben Leinbach, Buedi Siebert, and Rajendra Teredesai.
 
On the tune “Abhaya Mudrâ,” Indian healer and artist Kiran Murti sings about the art of treating and prolonging life as he calls upon the five elements that make up the universe. Fire, Water, Air, Earth, and Ether come together in a chant for healing. Voice, sitar, and Bansuri flute blend together in an Ayurvedic elixir for the spirit. Murti’s voice is rather soothing.
 
From Australia, Sacred Earth, a duo I am quite familiar with (Prem & Jethro Williams) presents the song “Guru Charanam.” It is unusual to hear Jethro sing, but on this one, his steady voice is at the helm until Prem joins him in the middle. The flute also plays a large part in a tune of what I think is about acceptance, about giving in to a Higher Power. As the elements come together, what holds them in concert is the sun.
 
“Prana,” the song offered by German performer Buedi Sieibert, speaks about the energy or life force that holds all things together. Using a very artistic flow, what sounds to me like an electronic sitar and a dynamic sounding drone, he creates a very calming atmosphere.
 
I am also acquainted with the artist Karunesh and I have reviewed him in the past. Karunesh invokes the spirit of the orient on the tune “Flowing Bamboo.” The evil spirits are chased away using bells in the opening of this haunting tune, but synthesizer and flute link up to cleanse the mental palate as the song carries on. This is my favorite on the album for having a balance of earthy organic and electronic sounds.
 
American Multi-instrumentalist Ben Leinbach gives us the song “Khumjung”. Tucked into a remote area of Nepal, it is a region of chronicles, with rock walls and caves that bear witness to sacred history. Wooden flute and sitar drone guide on the climb, but then allow you to make your own observations.
 
Rajendra Teredesai, one of India’s premier Bansuri flute players, blesses us with the tune “Shakti Dhyana.” His elongated, echoing notes are clear, almost pure. His melody meanders at times, but his path is evident. The result is a song that cajoles, summons, and invites the listener to begin her/his own quiet journey.

All of the tracks on Namasté Yoga are soothing to one degree or another. Some offer a meditative theme, while others are calming and tranquil. Hidden in the music however, is something undeniable, some positive energy lurking in the shadows that is there if you will only reach out for it. Namasté.
 
Rating: Good+

RJ Lannan

Mind Stretching. Almost every time I hear the word Namasté, I am reminded of the scene in the movie Avatar where the Naavi acknowledge each other. They translate their words as “I see you”, but actually referring to an understanding beyond the visual. Such is the earthly translation we are given for Namasté; “I bow to you”, I acknowledge your existence, your spirit. The talented artists who have contributed to this collection bow to your physical and metaphysical health. On Namasté Yoga, the fifth contribution to the Real Music Namasté series, I was delighted with the nine tracks of peaceful, spiritually motivated music that is perfect for meditation, exercise, or just plain relaxing. The recording is aimed toward yoga sessions, but I am hesitant to say just yoga, as Yoga to me is not only a form of structured exercise, but also a religion and a philosophy. In this case, I use the term for exercise in general. The recording has offerings by international, well-known artists Kiran Murit, Sacred Earth, Karunesh, Ben Leinbach, Buedi Sieibert, and Rajendra Teredesai.

On the tune “Abhaya Mudrâ”, Indian healer and artist Kiran Murti sings about the art of treating and prolonging life as he calls upon the five elements that make up the universe. Fire, Water, Air, Earth, and Ether come together in a chant for healing. Voice, sitar, and Bansuri flute blend together in an Ayurvedic elixir for the spirit. Murti’s voice is rather soothing.

From Australia, Sacred Earth, a duo I am quite familiar with (Prem & Jethro Williams) presents the song “Guru Charanam”. It is unusual to hear Jethro sing, but on this one, his steady voice is at the helm until Prem joins him in the middle. The flute also plays a large part in a tune of what I think is about acceptance, about giving in to a Higher Power.  

As the elements come together, what holds them in concert is the sun. “Prana”, the song offered by German performer Buedi Sieibert speaks about the energy or life force that holds all things together. Using a very artistic flow, what sounds to me like an electronic sitar and a dynamic sounding drone, he creates a very calming atmosphere.  

I am also acquainted with the artist Karunesh and I have reviewed him in the past. Karunesh invokes the spirit of the orient on the tune “Flowing Bamboo”. The evil spirits are chased away using bells in the opening of this haunting tune, but synthesizer and flute link up to cleanse the mental palate as the song carries on. This is my favorite on the album for having a balance of earthy organic and electronic sounds.

American Multi-instrumentalist Ben Leinbach gives me the song “Khumjung”. Tucked into a remote area of Nepal, it is a region of chronicles, with rock walls and caves that bear witness to sacred history. Wooden flute and sitar drone guide on the climb, but then allow you to make your own observations.

Rajendra Teredesai, one of India’s premier Bansuri flute players, blesses me with the tune Shakti Dhyana. His elongated, echoing notes are clear, almost pure. His melody meanders at times, but his path is evident. The result is a song that cajoles, summons, and invites the listener to begin her/his own quiet journey.

All of the tracks on Namasté Yoga are soothing to one degree or another. Some offer a meditative theme, while others are calming and tranquil. Hidden in the music however, is something undeniable, some positive energy lurking in the shadows that is there if you will only reach out for it. Namasté.

Rating: Good+

Real Music’s “Namasté” series feature Asian themed music for meditation, relaxation and healing practices, surrounding the listener in a cloud of serene beauty. Namasté Yoga continues that trend with a collection of musical pieces designed to present a comforting, supportive atmosphere within which yoga practice can flourish. The music has a strong Indian character, and all the pieces are on the softer side. A prime example would be Rajendra Teredesai’s sublime “Shakit Dhyana,” which features the contemplative twirls of the bansuri flute against the swirling drone of sitar and chimes. Pure sitar lies at the forefront of Kiran Murti’s “Pitta” — a lovely track steeped in traditional Indian classical sounds, and Karunesh spices up his Indian dabblings with a healthy dose of synth and rhythm on “Flowing Bamboo.”  Across the board, this is fantastic atmosphere music for yoga practice.

This is a gem for fans of the Real Music label. Namasté Yoga, the fifth in the label’s popular Namasté series, gives you the chance to revisit your favorite artists perfectly sequenced, and ideally combined for yoga, meditation, massage or any relaxation experience. Artists on this release include Sacred Earth, Karunesh, Ben Leinbach, Rajendra Teredesai, and more.

James McQuiston

Kiran Murti begins Namasté Yoga with a timeless sort of composition that provides listeners with an authentic feeling for a yoga experience; by the end of the track, listeners will be able to tackle the nearly ten-minute “Guru Charanam” by Sacred Earth. “Guru Charanam” has an atmospheric feel that approximates the winds and cold chill that a late-spring outdoor gathering would have. The momentum ebbs and flows in a fashion that ensures that listeners will continue to be motivated throughout, and the sheer depth and breadth of the music acts as a brief introduction to the similarly extensive array of styles and approaches that are taken on further in this collection.

Karunesh provides things alluring with “Flowing Bamboo,” a six-plus minute effort that leads listeners through a number of soundscapes. While the track begins with bold, strong strokes, the woodwinds and additional instruments unite to create a cogent and beautiful composition. Kiran Murti’s “Pitta” is the penultimate track on Namasté Yoga and draws listeners back to a timeless and classical experience.  This song creates a narrative that will resound with fans long after the album has ceased.  While only three minutes in length, Murti makes this arrangement one for the ages. Sacred Earth’s “Moola Mantra” completes this release, the perfect yin to Murti’s yang; the album begins and ends with the same Murti / Sacred Earth dynamic. The sequencing of this album creates a strong sense of finality – listeners are given a beginning and an end to a yoga session.

Chris Spector

Once again we find the label dipping into its back pages, old and new, to craft a themed work that also spreads the word to people that haven’t yet been “in the tent.” This is a well programmed set for yoga that doesn’t make you break a sweat unless you want to turn up the thermostat. This is good stuff for clearing your mind and getting to be “one with the universe.” Well done!